LinkedIn is the world’s largest business network.

It’s the online version of your Board of Trade or Chamber of Commerce.

It’s where business people are INVESTING time (not wasting time), which is why certain inappropriate LinkedIn status updates are like the sound of fingernails scratching a blackboard.

Here are some of the worst LinkedIn statuses:

#1. Cat pictures on LinkedIn. Really?!?

#2. Math problems. Let’s leave the Sudoku for the paper, people.

(Sadly, this update had 1242 responses)

#3. “What’s the first word you see” posts.

Quite frankly, I don’t know why people think this is a relevant business post, yet over 18,000 people commented.

Listen, I’m all for fun and games like the next guy. And I will admit, I like the occasional cat meme too, but on Facebook or Twitter – NOT on LinkedIn.

I know what some people are going to say:
“But Leslie,…these posts are getting “viral” attention! The more times people respond to status updates like these, the more frequently that brand is being circulated to a wider audience.”

Clearly with the number of responses, they do have an extended reach, but LinkedIn is not the appropriate channel.

What we post on LinkedIn isn’t necessarily appropriate for Twitter, or Facebook, or Instagram and vice versa. Each of these channels have a different raison d’etre.

Also, just because someone sees your brand a million times, it doesn’t mean that you are necessarily building a relationship with them. You build trust with your audience and convert business when you solve their problems, not by giving them a crossword puzzle.

Many people think that inspirational quotes are appropriate on LinkedIn. I personally don’t like having my feed inundated with these kinds of updates, but some business quotes are apropos.

We have to remember that we wouldn’t show up to our Board of Trade or Chamber of Commerce wearing a costume or our beach wear (unless it’s a themed event of course). We would be mindful of our business brand and would want to ensure that we appear professional and polished.

Everything you publish reflects you and your business; even in your non-working hours.

Before you click “send” you may want to ask yourself: Is this kind of content appropriate for building business or is it just “noise”?

Now it’s your turn: Do you agree? Disagree? Is anything “fair game” on LinkedIn?

Leslie Hughes is a LinkedIn Optimization Specialist, Professor of Social Media, Corporate Social Media Trainer and Principal of PUNCH!media

Leslie was called a “Social Media Guru” by CBC Radio and has been working in digital marketing since 1997 and founded PUNCH!media in 2009. PUNCH!media clients include The Children’s Wish Foundation of Canada, Guardian Life Insurance Company of America and TVO.

PUNCH!media’s goal is to empower through education and help executives gain confidence in their online presence so they convert higher paying clients.

www.punchmedia.ca
l
eslie@punchmedia.ca